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Snow to follow freezing rain, Environment Canada predicts

THUNDER BAY -- The city’s first significant taste of winter weather didn’t deliver metres of snow, but it certainly had an impact on area roadways.
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A thin blanket of snow covers an icy Arthur Street late Monday morning. Early morning freezing rain made many city streets an icy hazard, which was made worse in some areas when that rain turned into snow. (Phil Darlington, TBT News)

THUNDER BAY -- The city’s first significant taste of winter weather didn’t deliver metres of snow, but it certainly had an impact on area roadways.

Freezing rain began to touch down across the city early Monday morning, giving area roadways a thin layer of ice for motorists to contend with before the morning rush hour.

School buses were cancelled and city transit services were even sidelined for a short time. City police responded by issuing a reminder to motorists to drive according to the weather conditions.

By late Monday morning that freezing rain had left, but was quickly replaced by a light and constant snowfall.

Officials with Environment Canada explains that as a deep low pressure area over northern Lower Michigan tracks into Northeastern Ontario, colder air will get pumped in from the north.

According to Environment Canada, most of the Northwest can expect to receive between five and 10 centimetres of snow by the time the snowfall comes to an end Monday night.